Still hot....

Posted on 28th August, 2017

Dogs die in hot cars!!

 

Dogs die in hot cars

 

 

 

 

Yes i am still banging on about dogs being left in cars!!

 

Every year we await a call, someone has just nipped out to the shop and left their dog in the car, they cant understand whats happened when they come back and the dog doesn't seem right.

 

I thought by now everyone might know the message, but with the unusually hot weather still here in the UK looking to stay for a bit longer, i thought i'd better reiterate the point again!!

 

Never leave your dog alone in a car on a warm day. If you see a dog in distress in a hot car, dial 999.

 

Many people still believe that it’s ok to leave a dog in a car on a warm day if the windows are left open or they’re parked in the shade, but the truth is, it’s still a life changing situation for the dog.

 

A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly, even when it doesn’t feel that warm. When it’s 22 degrees, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within the hour.

 

What to do if you see a dog in a car on a warm day?

 

In an emergency, we may not be able to attend quickly enough, and with no powers of entry, we’d need police assistance at such an incident. Calling the RSPCA is a wasting time as by the time they get to the car the dog may be dead, and the RSPCA are unable to gain entry to a car without the police being present. If you think the dog is in genuine distress don’t be afraid to dial 999, the police will contact a local vet if animal welfare assistance is required. 

 

Try to find the owner of the car. Public announcement in the supermarket always works well.

If the owners of the car cannot be contacted, contact the police on 999 to attend the vehicle.

You should not take any action to gain access to the car without first speaking to the police. Always take images/footage of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident. The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971).

 

If a dog has been in a car for even a short time it may need its temperature brought down slowly by drinking and through cooling the body. We would recommend seeking veterinary advice on this if the animal is in distress.infographic on preventing dogs dying in hot cars

 

 

Can you help a dog in a hot car?

 

Establish the animal's health/condition. If they're displaying any signs of heatstroke dial 999 Immediately. 

 

If the situation becomes critical for the dog and the police are too far away/unable to attend, many people’s instinct will be to break into the car to free the dog. If you decide to do this, please be aware that without proper justification, this could be classed as criminal damage and, potentially, you may need to defend your actions in court. 

 

Make sure you tell the police what you intend to do, why, and take images/footage of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident. The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971).

 

Once removed, if the dog is displaying signs of heatstroke, you must get emergency first aid advice. This could mean the difference between life and death for the dog.

 

If the dog is not displaying symptoms of heatstroke:

 

Establish how long the dog has been in the car? A ‘pay and display’ ticket could help.

 

Make a note of the car’s registration. If the owner returns, but you still feel the situation was dangerous for the dog, you may still report the incident to the police. 

 

If you’re at a superstore/venue/event ask the staff to make an announcement to alert the owner of the situation. 

 

If possible, get someone to stay with the dog to monitor their condition. If they begin to display signs of distress/heatstroke, be prepared to dial 999. 

 

What are the signs of heatstroke?

 

  • Heavy panting
  • Drooling
  • A distressed facial expression
  • Rapid, heavy breathing
  • Confusion and disorientation
  • Shaking despite the heat
  • Red gums or mucous membranes
  • The dog feels hot
  • Weakness and collapse
  • Loss of consciousness

 

If you have the dog try and cool it down as quickly as possible, bottles of water, buckets of water from the sea or cold water soaked towels over the dog. Hopefully the dog isn't too bad and you will be able to take it to a vet.

 

If your dog has heatstroke it’s imperative to act fast in order to cool him down.

 

Offer water to drink

Don’t exert him. If necessary, carry (rather than walk) him to a cool place

Wet his coat, paws, and tongue with cool (not freezing water)

Blow cool air from a fan over him

If the dog seems drowsy, unsteady on his feet, or isn’t improving within five minutes then seek urgent veterinary attention.

 

 

5 reasons why leaving dogs in cars, even on a mildly warm day is a bad idea:

 

  • Mild days and car temperature are deceiving
  • Car temperature increases with time
  • Cooking canines in cars leads to heatstroke
  • Cranked windows make no difference
  • The sun doesn’t have to shine
  • What to do if you see a dog suffering in a locked car
  • The consequences of a dog dying in YOUR car.

  Mild Days and Car Temperature are deceiving

 

Even on a balmy day when the air temperature is a pleasant 21ºC, it only takes 60 minutes for the temperature inside a car to reach a blood-boiling 46ºC.

 

Why does this matter?

 

Because when a dog’s core temperature reaches 41ºC his blood becomes so thick it can’t circulate properly, he suffers organ failure, and dies. In short, even on a mild summer’s day dogs die in hot cars from heat exhaustion.

 

Car Temperature Increases with Time

 

There’s a reason recipes tell you to pre-heat the oven, and this is because the temperature rises with time. This is just the same with a car because after 60 minutes the temperature inside can be 4.4ºC (or 40ºF) hotter than outside. When you bear in mind that heatstroke in dogs occurs at core body temperatures around 41ºC (normal temperature 39.2ºC) and you begin to glimpse the problem.

 

Let’s take a look at this in terms of a summer’s day.

  • 21ºC air temperature, after 60 minutes the car temperature is 46ºC
  • 26ºC air temperature, after 60 minutes the car temperature is 52ºC
  • 32ºC air temperature it takes just 30 minutes to reach 48ºC inside a car

 

It’s easy to see the danger. You just have to touch the dashboard or seats to know how hot the inside of a car can get.” Mark Spowage. AA Patrol of the Year.

 

Cooking Canines in Cars leads to heatstroke

 

It’s 24ºC outside, jeans and T-shirt weather. On the drive home from the dog park you remember you’ve run out of nappies so you stop off. The superstore doesn’t allow dogs inside so you crank open the car windows, grab the baby, but leave the dog as he’ll fine for ten minutes.

 

Unfortunately, the baby needed a change and there was only one till open with a huge queue, and the ten-minute errand took half-an-hour. By this time the temperature inside the car has climbed to 42.7ºC 

 

From going on holiday to trips to the park, traveling with a dog in the car is inevitable. Tops tips for keeping your canine cool include:

 

Put the air con on

Wind the windows down a little (However, don’t allow the dog to stick his head outside through an open window.)

Take water and stop for frequent breaks

Take towels and plenty of water to soak your dog should he overheat

 

If you want to know why do dogs die in hot cars it’s because heat causes blood to thicken. This makes the circulation sluggish and key organs such as the brain and kidneys quickly become deprived of oxygen. In a worst-case scenario the dog can go into organ failure and die within minutes, which is why you should never leave your dog in a car in warm weather, even for a few minutes.

 

Remember, all it takes is a car the same temperature as a cool oven to cook meringues and your dog could be dead.

 

Cranked Windows make No Difference

 

According to the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) hundreds of pets die each year, from being left alone in hot cars. The trouble is, many of these dead dogs belonged to owners who believed that leaving the window open ajar meant their dog would be fine.

 

They found out the hard way they were wrong.

 

The Sun doesn’t have to Shine

 

Likewise heatstroke in dogs doesn’t just happen when the sun shines. What matters is how hot it is outside; It’s the temperature that counts, so even when parked in shade or on an overcast day, a car acts like a greenhouse and it gets hotter and hotter inside.

 

“48% of people who leave their dog in a car in hot weather believe its OK because they’re parked in the shade of the window is open.” Dogs’ Trust survey

 

What to do if you see a dog locked in a car

 

Try to find the owner of the car. Public announcement in the supermarket always works well.

If the owners of the car cannot be contacted, contact the police on 999 to attend the vehicle.

You should not take any action to gain access to the car without first speaking to the police. Always take images/footage of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident. The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971).

 

The Dogs Trust made a 20 minute time lapse video a couple of years ago its very hard hitting and to the point, after everything written above you still don't know what the big deal is check out this video

 

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